Next Stop: SOALatam Conference Lima / Peru


Just back from Oracle Open Word 2015 in San Francisco, it’s a great honor for me that my presentation Docker Containers: A Thorough and Critical Overview was accepted for the the SOALatam conference in Lima.

Most presentation will be in Spanish, I will the only non-latino speaker apart from Thomas Erl.

I am looking forward to a world class conference in Lima and to meeting friends such as Tabata Jessica Pérez as well as Rolando Carrasco and Arturo Viveros from the SOA myth buster team. Thomas Erl is the keynote speaker and it’s also a good opportunity to win a top notch computer science text book :-)

Heaps of reasons for a trip to Lima. CU there!


Oracle Cloud: ICS

Quite a while ago (a year before Larry announced the Oracle Public Cloud) I wrote about SaaS applications and a service bus PaaS to interconnect services: “… services are integrated and virtualized by a service bus in the cloud and orchestrated by a workflow system in the cloud [Oracle Middleware and Cloud Computing] “.

Back then it almost seemed like building castles in Spain. Indeed it took several years to build the PaaS service – yet today Thomas Kurian and Larry Ellison announce Oracle’s ICS. Now it’s out there with all the agility that comes with a cloud based solution.

It’s the cloud! So get a test account, play with it, scale it and try to break it!

Let me know what you think using @frankmunz and add: @soacommunity.

photo: F.M.

DOAG 2012 Konferenz: WebLogic and Cloud Talk

WebLogic Talk

I will hack a WebLogic password live at DOAG 2012 conference 😉
… and explain 9 more things you should know about WLS12c. Mostly stuff out of my WebLogic Advanced Recipe book.

There will also be some chocolate and a book to win!

My WebLogic 12c talk on Tuesday.

Cloud Talk

Don’t miss my cloud talk! I will demonstrate live a couple of things you won’t be able to with the Oracle cloud 😉  Public Cloud talk on Wednesday. More chocolate and of course another book to win!

Oracle Database as a Service in the Amazon Cloud: Now with APEX, Oracle XML DB and your Data Center’s IPs.

Amazon Web Services improved its Relational Database as a Service (RDS) for Oracle. It now supports APEX (finally, see the lengthy APEX discussion here), the OracleXMLDB and Virtual Private Cloud (VPC).

For more information:


Cloud Computing Workshop 2011: Oracle, Rackspace and Amazon

This year I really kept the best until the end! Last week I was running a 2-day cloud computing workshop with a 2-hour hands-on management presentation the night before the workshop for Contribute in Belgium. Contribute is an Oracle Platinum partner and being surrounded by Oracle Fusion Middleware experts, DBAs, application architects and senior level management the technical level of the workshop was very high with many interesting discussions.

We covered Oracle Public Cloud (OPC), Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Rackspace (RS). OPC is not available yet, but the overall functionality including its limitations for the first release is more or less known and quite interesting compared to let’s say running WebLogic on AWS.

To prove the point I was running WebLogic 12c on AWS cloud with 30GB of heap on a high-mem 4xl instance with 8 cores. Proving the point cost me a bit more than US$2.

Typically I expected that the more tech savvy audience prefers AWS over Rackspace, yet this time people were impressed by the easy setup of Rackspace and the way they handled a minor problem with their web console file-upload feature during a live chat session.

Among hundreds of other details we looked at the I/O performance. The performance of Amazon’s EBS is known to be interesting (you may want to read this as ‘difficult’). See Adrian’s posting for a thorough explanation, some benchmarks here, and some more details there.

The out-of-the-box performance looking at Rackspace Cloud is more consistent and there is a surprisingly high throughput which is almost independent of the data size. Here is some data comparing a local laptop disk, to the disks attached to the Rackspace Cloud servers to my brand new consumer SSD (not sure if a 512 GB SSD still qualifies as ‘consumer’). All numbers refer to a READ-benchmark with increasing data size.

Laptop HD (500GB SATA): 80 MB/s

Laptop SSD (Crucial m4): 281 MB/s

Rackspace (SAN): 302 MB/s


I am only posting the screenshot for one of the Rackspace I/O measurements since quality isn’t perfect. There is some older data with graphs available in a previous post of mine.










Now I am still curious about the dip on the left part of the graph which is consistent over several instances and measurements. Any comments?