DevOps tools: http REST client httpie

Doing unplanned things adds fun to our lives. Last year at Open World when heading back to the Hilton I sneaked into a REST session at Java One that I never planned to attend. Honestly, I went there to finish my very late lunch. There I learned about a REST client tool that you should add to your toolbox: http (pronounced “HTTP Pie”, with the brave abbreviation: http).

In short http is more convenient version of curl, for the non-color blind folks. It includes heaps of features, like storing session data that can referenced for following requests, easy specification of JSON values, etc.

Here is an example of its usage with the the new WebLogic 12.2.1 REST interface for administration:

http -a weblogic:welcome1 \ "localhost:7001/management/weblogic/latest/domainRuntime/serverLifeCycleRuntimes/AdminServer?links=none&fields=name,state"


Screen Shot 2016-04-15 at 09.34.54

You read it here first. But also check out my other DevOps tools postings like lsof, high CPU threads, tunnel with ngrok.


DevOps tools: Easily tunnel your localhost (WebLogic or some other) server with ngrok to the world

Here is another addition to my DevOps tools series that is worth to know if you work with any kind of servers such as WebLogic, nginx or Apache httpd etc.

ngrok is a fun and very easy tool I use from time to time in demos or when running a training.
It opens a public tunnel (that of course can be protected) to connect to your local server. Really nice if you are in a different network than your audience, or hidden between a DSL router etc.

In the webcast below I show how to access WebLogic 12.2.1 running on localhost:7001

You read it here first 🙂

also check out the webcasts of the DevOps tools series about how to detect high CPU threads, or the usage of lsof.


DevOps Basics I: Track Down High CPU Thread with ps, top and the new JDK7 jcmd Tool.

I captured the following webcast last night. I was writing about how a clever combination of simple tools like ps, top and jcmd can help to track down the Java code that is causing a thread to consume a high amount CPU time.

The approach is very generic and works for WebLogic, Glassfish or any other Java application. UNIX commands in the example are run on CentOS, so they will work without changes for Oracle Enterprise Linux or RedHat.
Creating the thread dump at the end of the video is done with the jcmd tool from JDK7.

The webcast uses the StuckThreadForFree sample application which is specific for WebLogic 12c and can be downloaded from my stuck thread recipe.